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Review: Ready Player One

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There is almost an infinite amount of movies that have come from books, like “Harry Potter” or “Lord of the Rings.” “Ready Player One” was originally a novel written by Ernest Cline about a young gamer named Wade Watts, who becomes destined to save the virtual reality world called the OASIS. Him and his friends have to win an easter egg hunt that the creator of the OASIS, James Halliday, lets out after he passes away before IOI, a rotten no-good online equipment corporation, takes complete control over the digital world. The book was then set to become a movie that would be led and directed by critically acclaimed writer and director, Steven Spielberg, with Cline by his side helping to write the screenplay. Since the movie’s debut to theaters all over the world, “Ready Player One” has gotten many mixed reviews, but overall, it was praised for the message that was deeply entailed in the movie’s narrative: taking a leap of faith, and believing in each other.
A big part of this movie is based in the OASIS, and like the real-world, people find the online gaming community to be a safe haven from reality. However, being stuck to the screen can cause problems. Spielberg shows the audience that life is not all about games; his message is so subtle but so prominent in the movie. Essentially, the audience watches as Parzival and his friends become more connected throughout the story, and the only way it is done is by being active in the real world. If Parzival and his friends had no initiative to save the OASIS, then there would not be a story, nor would there be any interaction and connection between the characters. With that being said, Spielberg and Cline both expressed very clearly that the world can always be a better place when the technological world does not overtake the real world.
Another message that is told in the movie is to take a leap of faith in life. CHS is made up of so many individuals who are still in a place where they are learning, growing, and maturing. Now in “Ready Player One,” this idea plays out in the story because each character in his or her own way has to believe in themself to do something they think they cannot.
These two messages that Spielberg and Cline promote in this fun flick may not seem like much, but they can really be a big difference in our teenage lives. Being able to differentiate life from the real world and the gaming world can help keep us connected to our community and become more social and outgoing. Also, being able to step and take a leap of faith can help all students at CHS become connected as well. “Ready Player One” may not be everyone’s favorite or least favorite movie, but the message that is told through it is one that every person should think about.

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Review: Ready Player One